Fiddling on Climate

Escrito por  |  7 / December / 2011

There’s a global consensus on what has to be done to stop global warming–cut back immediately on emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. But at the Durban COP 17, once again, the U.S. and other developed countries refuse to agree to an international framework for saving the planet.

South America consolidates its role as an emerging power

Escrito por  |  5 / December / 2011

The recent meeting of UNASUR Defense ministers and the Brazilian parliamentary debate on defense reveal that the region has made the decision to defend itself in the face of the intensifying global climate of war.

Why Should We Care About Mexico?

Escrito por  |  5 / December / 2011

50,000 drug war-related homicides; hundreds of thousands wounded, orphaned, disappeared, displaced and traumatized, human rights violations, gender-based violence, impunity–if for no other reason, we should care about the violence in Mexico because it represents a humanitarian crisis of enormous proportions.

The City of Outrage: The Impact of Violence in Ciudad Juarez

Escrito por  |  5 / December / 2011

Ciudad Juarez is a sad city, terrorized and weakened, inside and out, leveled by profound emptiness and hopelessness, and brought to its knees by organized crime and the incapacity of the authorities to provide even basic safety.

Twin War

Escrito por  |  5 / December / 2011

Ordered by Felipe Calderón in December 2006, the war came to Chihuahua in March 2008 with “Joint Operation Chihuahua”. This is a binational war–the only way to understand it is to think about the decision-making, capital flows, social networks, institutions, and beneficiaries on each side of the border.

Free Markets and the Food Crisis in Central America

Escrito por  |  21 / November / 2011

The link between trade liberalization and food availability is becoming a critical factor that, far from improving living conditions, threatens to deepen and entrench the structural causes of hunger, violence and malnutrition in the region.

Immigrants Join Protest as Occupy Wall Street Movement Grows

Escrito por  |  3 / November / 2011

Sebastian Fernandez, 25, a graduate student born in Colombia, works the Spanish information desk of the Occupy Wall Street camp on the edge of Zucotti Park. At the corner of Liberty and Broadway, flanked by hot dog vendors and police barricades, he sits at a folding table laden with Spanish-language copies of the protest’s newspaper, the “Occupy Wall Street Journal”.