Status of violence against women in Honduras

logo5

Honduras has been rated by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) as the country with the highest homicide rate in the world from 2010 until 2012, when the most recent report was issued.1 From 2005 to 2013, the number of violent deaths of women rose by 263.4%. This violence is the result of multiple factors, including high levels of economic inequity and inequality, poverty, corruption, militarization, and an ever increasing presence of organized crime and drug trafficking, all of which has a strong negative impact on the human rights of the population, and on the lives of women in particular.

El Salvador Lacks Accurate Data on Child Migration

Escrito por  |  15 / July / 2014
20140701_120002

Officials at the Salvadoran Foreign Ministry do not have accurate data on the number of children who are traveling to the United States illegally at the hands of smugglers. The Vice Minister for Salvadorans Abroad, Liduvina Magarín, recently visited 12 sites that function as shelters, detention centers, and migrant processing centers located in the southern U.S. border. In a single day, these places received 310 Salvadoran children. Given the traffic and movement of people in recent months, it is speculated that the daily number of children passing through that border is between 500 and 600 Salvadoran children who have been sent with coyotes to the United States.

Brazil, Defeat and the High Cost of Hosting FIFA’s World Cup

Escrito por  |  14 / July / 2014
FIFA-Go-Home

Seven years ago when Brazil was announced as FIFA’s selected host country for this year’s World Cup, Brazilians celebrated in the streets. on the eve of the tournament, polls showed that most people in the very country that has enjoyed more World Cup victories than any other no longer wanted to host the tournament whose final match played out July 13. Why the drastic change in public opinion, over a game Brazilians clearly adore?

A Day Like Today, Now.

Escrito por  |  9 / July / 2014
Militarización en el Bajo Aguán, Honduras. Fotografía de Giorgio Trucchi.

On a day like today five years ago, I woke up with the noise of military planes crisscrossing the skies, and without light, without water, without news. It was June 28, 2009 and the chronicles of the impossible were yet to be written. In the entire world, even in Honduras, our generation thought that coups d’état had passed into history. We were wrong.

From El Barrio to La Realidad, Women Lead Struggles to Transform the World

Escrito por  |  3 / July / 2014
Movimujeres1

The women of the Movement for Justice in El Barrio–a community-based organization led by immigrant women in New York– and the Zapatista women of La Realidad are two examples of how women in struggle all over the world are coming together to inspire and learn from each other, and how, in the process, they are transforming the world.

Mining and Post-conflict in Colombia

Escrito por  |  3 / July / 2014
retroexcavadora

A meeting in Popayán, capital of the Cauca department, was the excuse for learning about a complex and violent reality. The war between the military, paramilitaries, guerrillas, and drug traffickers is intertwined with savage extractivism, with illegal mining its worst expression.

Being Young and Zapatista in La Realidad

Escrito por  |  3 / July / 2014
ImageProxy (1)

Selena is a young woman born into Zapatismo and brought up in and with a Zapatista autonomous education. She knows no gender or age restrictions. She was appointed to a post that is indispensable to the survival of the collective–to register facts and occurrences and then share with the community what she has heard, discovered and learned. Nobody doubts her truth or integrity, her strength or the fidelity of the information she communicates. She was trained for this. The Assembly chose her for this role because of these qualities.