Drug War

Death Squad Revelations and the New Police in Honduras

Escrito por  |  1 / July / 2016
tesones1

On June 21, 2015 the London-based Guardian newspaper published an article describing the testimony of a soldier who says he deserted the army after his unit was given an order to kill activists whose names appeared on two lists. The second list contained the name of Lenca indigenous leader Berta Caceres, murdered last March.

The Ayotzinapa Agenda

Escrito por  |  31 / May / 2016
Cg27_J5UcAEjdCi

The role of the Interamerican Commission on Human Rights has not ended with the exit of the GIEI. However, it now falls to Mexican society to assume the responsibility for continuing its work. The work isn’t so much technical, as political and social—it’s the work of mobilization, building solidarity and exerting constant pressure.

The Caravan for Peace, Life and Justice Demands End to Drug War in New York City

Escrito por  |  20 / April / 2016
IMG_1669

Our day of speaking truth to UNGASS began in Foley Square, New York City, just steps away from the federal prison. VOCAL NY, Latino Justice, Make the Road Brooklyn, LEAP, Moms United, Black Fraternal Organization of Honduras (OFRANEH), Stop the Harm, Drug Policy Alliance and others.

The Lethal Arms of the U.S. Drug War in Honduras

Escrito por  |  12 / April / 2016
Troops from USSOUTHCOM train Hondurans at Puerto Castilla Navy base - photo Dialogo Revista Militar Digital

On December 28, 2015 in the early morning, the Honduran Navy shot and killed two Afro-Indigenous Garifuna men, Jostin Lino Palacios, age 24 and Elvis Garcia, age 19 in Barra de Iriona in the department of Colon, on the northeast coast of Honduras.

Pope’s Border Visit Leaves Victims’ Groups Divided on its Impact

Escrito por  |  19 / February / 2016
1802169facdf60fmed

By the end of the pope’s visit, activists wondered whether their organizing efforts and messages to the pope were enough to inspire long-lasting justice on the border.

The Extraordinary Disappeared

Escrito por  |  11 / February / 2016
normaandrade

What is extraordinary is not the crime. The crime of disappearance is part of the structural violence that has become daily life in Mexico. What is extraordinary is the families’ fight for their missing loved ones. These men and women are an example of courage and good citizenship for the whole country.

US Gives Millions to “Export” Justice to Mexico, but in Border State It’s Breaking Bad

Escrito por  |  14 / January / 2016
hawkes

Most U.S. aid to Mexico supports governance, justice and “rule of law” reforms aimed at curbing corruption and remolding the notoriously dysfunctional Mexican justice system. But corruption pervades the U.S. justice system and the state of New Mexico is a good example.